startups

Showing 139 posts tagged startups

Though driven and innovative, hypomanics are at much higher risk for depression than the general population, notes Gartner. Failure can spark these depressive episodes, of course, but so can anything that slows a hypomanic’s momentum. “They’re like border collies—they have to run,” says Gartner. “If you keep them inside, they chew up the furniture. They go crazy; they just pace around. That’s what hypomanics do. They need to be busy, active, overworking.”

Finally got around to reading this Inc. article - "The Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship."

Many passages in the article were familiar, but for better or worse, this particular passage hit close to home. 

It’s easy to waste more time looking for shortcuts than you’ll ever save by finding them. Sometimes, the path is clear: other people have already walked it, and they’ll even tell you where it is if you look. Meanwhile, other people – who haven’t walked the path, but want you to follow them – will offer you shortcuts. That’s when you end up getting lost.

this quote is about training to do ‘muscle-ups,’ but it applies to, well, everything… 

http://livehard.co.uk/2014/04/03/why-you-should-stop-looking-for-shortcuts-or-how-to-do-muscle-ups-in-two-weeks/

When I was a junior in college, I spent many late nights in the video editing suite of the Modern Culture & Media department. It was a quiet lab, but occasionally I’d be there with another student named Chris Savage.

My cofounder, Dan, sometimes joined me to work on video projects, but I rarely joined him in the CIT Lab. Had I, I would’ve likely met another student by the name of Brendan Schwartz.

Fast forward two years to 2006, and Chris and Brendan started a company - Wistia - that eventually came to be an awesome video platform for small and medium sized businesses. I was an early user of their first product, and then Dan and I became customers of their next product, as the video back-end for our first company, HomeField (now Rightplay). 

Still with me?

No matter. Point is, it’s funny how small the world is, and how some people are just inextricably weaved into the fabric of your life. Chris and Brendan are exactly that, and they’re simply awesome people, too.

So, when the guys came to town last week, I thought it’d be a great chance to shoot a quick interview with them. Despite the funky color (is Chris purple? Am I?) and my lazy jump-cutting, I think you get a great sense of Wistia and how they look at the world. If you’re into the video ecosystem, it’s worth a watch.

Some highlights:

  • 1:14 Chris describes the Wistia Learning Center.
  • 2:16 The launch of their new HTML5 player!
  • 4:04 Using video for business.
  • 8:42 What are the biggest challenges in our space?

We’re back!

That’s right. Shelby.tv is live in the App Store again and open as a public beta on web and mobile web…

And it. Feels. Great.

The new Shelby.tv iPhone app is the best product we’ve built to date. It’s fast, elegantly designed, and filled with great content personalized just for you.

Our goal is the same as it’s always been… to be the best way to discover and enjoy videos. Videos that are just like you: edgy, quirky, smart, ridiculous, and sometimes just plain beautiful.

If you have an iPhone, there’s literally no reason not to give it a try. 

Download in the App Store, today.

Allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind. Cultivate that capacity for “negative capability.” We live in a culture where one of the greatest social disgraces is not having an opinion, so we often form our “opinions” based on superficial impressions or the borrowed ideas of others, without investing the time and thought that cultivating true conviction necessitates. We then go around asserting these donned opinions and clinging to them as anchors to our own reality. It’s enormously disorienting to simply say, “I don’t know.” But it’s infinitely more rewarding to understand than to be right — even if that means changing your mind about a topic, an ideology, or, above all, yourself…

…Be generous. Be generous with your time and your resources and with giving credit and, especially, with your words. It’s so much easier to be a critic than a celebrator. Always remember there is a human being on the other end of every exchange and behind every cultural artifact being critiqued. To understand and be understood, those are among life’s greatest gifts, and every interaction is an opportunity to exchange them.

Happy Birthday, Brain Pickings: 7 Things I Learned in 7 Years of Reading, Writing, and Living (via khuyi)

There is so much good stuff in this post, but these two really stick out to me as I believe they are intricately linked together and our relationships hinge upon the ability to understand and be understood, even in the face of uncertainty. It’s obviously relatable in startups, but is much more widely applicable to all of our relationships.